Irrigation Restrictions

Rainfall Shut Off Devices
Rainfall Shut Off Devices
 

Rain sensors, also called rain shut-off devices, are designed to interrupt the cycle of an automatic irrigation system controller when a specific amount of rainfall has occurred. They are small devices wired to the irrigation system controller and are mounted in an open area where they are exposed to rainfall. All automatic sprinkler systems  are required to have a functioning rain shut-off device. To learn how to test yours, visit the Alliance for Water Efficiency. 

To further reduce wasteful watering during rain events, consider installing an Evapotransportation Irrigation Controller (look for the waterSense label) or a Soil Moisture Sensor. Click the links below to view University of Florida videos on these advanced technologies:

Soil Moisture Sensor

Evapotransporation Irrigation Controler

Click HERE to see our television commercial!

 

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Irrigation Restrictions
Irrigation Restrictions

Landscape irrigation can account for 60% of residential water use. Reducing irrigation is a great way to save money while leaving more water for our springs and future generations! Click here for our Irrigation brochure.

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  • Irrigation is restricted between 10 am and 4 pm (when evaporation is greatest).
  • Irrigation is limited to no more than one hour or 3/4 inch per irrigation zone per irrigation day.
  • Restrictions apply to wells, lakes, creeks, and city water.
  • Automatic irrigation systems must have a functioning shut off device which bypasses irrigation when there is sufficient moisture.
  • The following are exempt: vegetable gardens, hand watering with a spray nozzle with an automatic shut off, reclaimed water, athletic fields, micro-irrigation, and new landscapes for the first 60 days.
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How are irrigation restrictions enforced?
How are irrigation restrictions enforced?

Alachua County has a cost share agreement with the St. Johns River Water Management District to implement irrigation restrictions. Inspections occur in high water use areas and violators receive a warning letter explaining the restrictions. Repeat offenders may receive a citation, but we hope everyone will comply to save more water! Staff also responds to irrigation complaints and appreciates the time, location of the potential violation, and a description of what was observed.

Report Irrigation Violations to 352-264-6800

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Watering Restrictions are the law!
Watering Restrictions are the law!

On October 13th, 2009 the Board of County Commissioners adopted an Irrigation Conservation Standards and Management Practices Code for Alachua County.

For more information, please contact the Alachua County Environmental Protection Department at 352-264-6800.

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Landscaping for Springs Protection
Landscaping for Springs Protection
Our Springs need our help! Water quality, clarity, and levels have been decreasing in many of our springs. The keys to protecting springs are:
 
  • Reducing Nutrients and
  • Reducing Water Use

 

Even if you don't live near a spring you may be affecting the springs because the water that soaks into the ground at your house may travel through underground tunnels and caves to springs miles away. Harmful fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides may be leached from your yard and end up in our springs. 
 
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When we use water to irrigate our lawns, wash our clothes and dishes, etc.- we may be contributing to the lower water levels at nearby springs.
 
To protect springs, minimize the use of irrigation and chemicals. Learn more HERE.
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